9/08/2015

THE HIMALAYA AND SHERPAS

The documentary, Climbing Everest with a Mountain on My Back – The Sherpa’s Story, affects me. The glistening icing on the mountainside, on the flanks of which, several small leaves of intricate Buddhist prayer flags flutters in varied colours and the very misty and breezy, divine atmosphere is reminiscent of my home. Obviously, it would be, for my home is also on a mountainside belonging to young Himalaya.
picture source: theguardian
Everest is a natural wonder the geographical movements of the Earth has created. Its emergence isn’t significant for a reason that it homes people residing at its foothills; the mountain, high as it’s, has developed curiosity from the time, probably immemorial, for the natives regard it sacred abode of Gods and foreigners, tempted to explore the height, has taken challenges as early as score years before the official conquering by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay, the first Sherpa to create history on the mountain top. Ever since, the mountain climbing has become one to be achieved goal in the lists of adventure filled people. For such people in achieving their aim, who could be more helpful asset than those naturally apt and indigenously skilled Sherpas. This is how the mountain has provided a business for those amazing race of human.

The brave ‘unsung heroes’ of the mountain not only pose their lives on lethal risk for the sake of other’s purpose, but also knits kinship in the process of the climb. This is how gentle they are, the people of the mountain to whom the arduous incredible climb is life trend to tread on.

The familiar rituals they let do before the journey for the welfare of the team and spiritual strength is very same to Bhutanese tradition. Buddhist they are. And it leaves no wonder that the people, as we share the same religion, could also be sharing a common forefather ethnicity with us. Himalaya unites us in this sense. So, Sherpa is my brother too. 

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